Memory, My Old Friend

As Notre Dame burned on the night of April 15, 2019, all my memories of Paris converged, accordion-like, folding inward, into that deep place of mine where not much gets in. Sobs, tears, disbelief. History ignited, bursting into flames, before my very eyes. Never mind that history, by its very nature, changes day to day, … More Memory, My Old Friend

A Kitchen in Exile

Until recently, I really never thought of exile as having anything to do with me. To speak of exile brings up visions of Napoleon Bonaparte languishing on Elba (later St. Helena) or Leonardo da Vinci doodling in the Château du Clos Lucé, near Amboise, France, yearning for his native Italy. Or the sad case today … More A Kitchen in Exile

Taking the Train (of Thought) to Honduras: COVID-19 Isolation, Day 70

It’s raining. And it’s Day 70 of lockdown, with no end in sight. I see people bursting out of their homes, congregating here and there. The local Publix grocery store ceased social distancing measures, while still demanding that customers wear masks. All I can do right now is retreat into re-readings of Stephen King and … More Taking the Train (of Thought) to Honduras: COVID-19 Isolation, Day 70

The Fallibility of Memory, or, The Fabulists among Us

Memory is a funny thing. By “funny,” I’m not thinking Woody Allen amusing or Amy Schumer hilarious. No, by “funny” I mean something akin to “strange” or “perplexing” or even “otherworldly.” And indeed memory can be perplexing, making it appear as the stuff of fabulists. Trying to remember what happened last week, much less 50 or … More The Fallibility of Memory, or, The Fabulists among Us