Remembering Jane Grigson, a British Food Writer Gone Too Soon*

Since it looks like I won’t be sitting in a pub quaffing Guinness anytime soon, I decided to dig out a few of my British cookbooks and think of England. Thinking of England, especially if you’re a food-crazed blogger with a penchant for the past, means recalling food writer Elizabeth David, and of course, Alan … More Remembering Jane Grigson, a British Food Writer Gone Too Soon*

Lessons from Medieval England: The Relationship Between the Sick Room and the Kitchen

Let food be thy medicine, and let thy medicine be food. ~Hippocrates Food and medicine, always intertwined in the human  imagination. Because – obviously – the earliest English settlers brought their food habits and medicinal beliefs with them to what is now the United States, I relish books that provide background to the English way … More Lessons from Medieval England: The Relationship Between the Sick Room and the Kitchen

Before There was Martha S., There was Martha B.*

Martha Bradley’s The British Housewife (1756) has long fascinated me, for all her detail and  precise instructions. And, most of all,  for her emphasis on local foods, long before Alice Waters or Michael Pollan were gleams in the eye of God. Of course, the other point I want to make here is this: the English were quite … More Before There was Martha S., There was Martha B.*

The Eels of Hannah, Or, Hannah Glasse’s Lenten Recipes

In my forthcoming book – with illustrations by Courtney Nzeribe – I discuss Hannah Glasse’s cookbook. (And much more, of course!)   Poor Hannah Glasse. Literally. Except for Martha Stewart, she may be the only cookery book writer who did hard time for financial woes. Author of The Art of Cookery Made Plain and Easy, … More The Eels of Hannah, Or, Hannah Glasse’s Lenten Recipes

Capouns In Councys, from The Forme of Cury (1390)

Just an example of the type of recipes you will be able to recreate with the help of my upcoming book, A Hastiness of Cooks.  Recipe reconstructed and recreated from archaic language. An example of what’s in my upcoming book, “A Hastiness of Cooks.” Chicken in a saffron-infused sauce, flavored with Poudre Forte, or “Strong Powder.” … More Capouns In Councys, from The Forme of Cury (1390)

Biscuits or Scones: British Origins of an American Favorite!

Nope. I can just see your neurons pointing fingers, your eyes sending signals to your brain, with a little interior voice saying, “Oh, yes, those are biscuits, just like my grandma used to make.” But don’t be mistaken when you look at that photo. Nope. Those are scones. Which I baked the other day from a … More Biscuits or Scones: British Origins of an American Favorite!

The Curry Guy

Curry. I can’t live without it. And thus it was only natural that I used some of my Santa Claus money to buy myself a copy of Dan Toombs’s clever cookbook, The Curry Guy: Recreate Over 100 of the Best British Indian Restaurant Recipes at Home (2017). The cooking found in British Indian Restaurants. Or BIRs. … More The Curry Guy