George Washington’s Family Cookbooks

Martha Washington's cookbook tells a tale, one that really needs no elaboration:  George went through life toothless. Recipes for soft puddings, quidonys (a type of fruit preserve), and jellies abound. Of course, puddings testified in part to the, well, Englishness of the Father of Our Country and his wife. But the fact of the matter…

Tavern on the Green: 125 Recipes for Good Times

On February 9, 2009 comes a new, feel-good, remember-the-booming times kind of cookbook that drops names of big stars and celebrities, along with terrific recipes, Tavern on the Green: 125 Recipes for Good Times. Written by the owners of the famous New York City restaurant Tavern on the Green, Jennifer Oz LeRoy and her mother…

Fabulous Food Blogs

The other day, a fellow food blogger awarded the Fabulous Food Blog Award to Gherkins & Tomatoes.  See the post HERE. Now that the torch has been passed, I must swing the award to five other food bloggers and list my five most serious food-related addictions. There are ever so many food blogs out there…

Sunday Suppers at Lucques: A Review in Rhapsody

Sunday Suppers at Lucques, by Suzanne Goin with Teri Gelber (Knopf/New York, 2005) Sunday suppers --- not something you associate with high-class dining. Right? Wrong. Award-winning California chef, Suzanne Goin, of Lucques and A.O.C in Los Angeles, started serving Sunday suppers at Lucques in 1998. Each Sunday supper - always a three-course extravaganza of appetizers,…

Cracking the Crock-Pot Code: One-Pot Meals

On a deeper level it [cucina povera] reflects a necessary philosophy that is common in all cultures: making do with what you've got to transform humble ingredients into dishes that are more than the sum of their parts. (Faith Hopler, "The Kitchen") No wonder I've been dreaming of Le Creuset Dutch Ovens lately. With the…

Puglia: A Culinary Memoir

Santa Claus flat out forgot me this year. I knew instantly that the jolly old elf  passed me by when I scrounged around in my Christmas stocking. No lump of coal. But no copy of Maria Pignatelli Ferrante's Puglia: A Culinary Memoir either. And this prize of a book  didn't even make it into the…

The Washington Post on Best Cookbooks (Gifts) of 2008

An interesting and REAL list (for the most part) of cookbooks for serious and not-so-serious home cooks. Some of the 18 titles anointed and blessed  by The Post include: A Platter of Figs, by David Tanis (So popular right now that it can't be had from any of the big online --- or local ---…

MILK: That Old White Magic

[Note: Ironically, I just came across this December 15, 2008 NPR interview with Anne Mendelson:  "A Culinary History of Milk Through the Ages." The NPR story includes a recipe for Apple-Onion Cream Soup.] Milk: The Surprising Story of Milk Through the Ages, with 120 Adventurous Recipes that Explore the Riches of Our First Food, by…

Obama’s “Secretary of Food”: An Idea Whose Time has Come, Thanks to Nicholas Kristof

In the his December 10, 2008 column in The New York Times, Nicholas Kristof states that the name of the department responsible for food and agriculture in the United States should be called the Department of Food. His reasoning is that only 2 percent of the American population actually farms, but 100 percent eats. Good…

Obama’s Secretary of Agriculture: The Saga Continues

John Salazar? Is a potato farmer. With strong ties to corporate agriculture. The blogging world, at least those interested in who might take over the reins at the USDA (see Mark Bittman of the New York Times on this issue), think that maybe John Salazar of Colorado might be the pick. La Vida Locavore, in…

Obama, the Cookbook

I knew it would happen. An Obama cookbook, or rather, an Obama Foodie book. After all, a guy's got to eat, right? Even if he is the President of the United States. Steven Black is writing a book about Obama food. Who is Steven Black? Let him tell his own story: Stephen Black has worked…

Heirloom Cooking and Baking: Nothing’s Really New Under the Sun

Every year new cookbooks, always welcome, spill like fruit from a Thanksgiving cornucopia. This fall, the newest fruit in the mix is Heirloom Cooking by the Brass sisters, Marilyn and Sheila. Publishers Weekly says: The Brass sisters (Heirloom Baking) once again pore through their impressive collection of timeworn note cards, cookbooks and manuscripts to offer…

Foodie Books About France

I recently submitted a list of fabulous food writing to  Peter Steinberg of Flashlight Worthy, a great original and innovative site. All readers, please go to Foodie Books About France at Peter's site and explore the rest of his site, which is terrific for booklovers and readers with all sorts of interests. © 2008 C.…

Cookbooks Facts

Some cool facts about recent cookbooks according to Gourmand World Cookbook Awards, taking place this weekend at the Frankfurt Book Fair, a truly international event: 1. In the last twelve years, over 5,000 publishers produced 200,000 cookbooks. 2. Self-published food writers and cookbook authors publish more and more new books, challenging the traditional publishers. 3.…

Hearthside Cooking

Hearthside Cooking: Early American Southern Cuisine Updated for Today's Hearth and Cookstove By Nancy Carter Crump Due out in November 2008,  the second edition of Nancy Carter Crump's Hearthside Cooking: Early American Southern Cuisine Updated for Today's Hearth and Cookstove looks like it will be one my "crowned princes," sitting on the small shelf in…

EARLIEST ENGLISH COOKBOOK, FORME OF CURY, TO BE DIGITIZED

Yippee! Another ancient cookbook to be digitized so that all of us food history lovers can wallow in the old texts without sneezing from the dust or going broke on airfare fees flying to check out archival material in some out-of-the-way library half-way across the world. The Guardian announced recently that the University of Manchester…

LEAFING OUT: Cooking with Asian Leaves

A new (to me, anyway) cookbook always heralds further culinary adventures for armchair explorers. In Cooking with Asian Leaves, authors Devagi Sanmugam and Christopher Tan---both residents of Singapore---ladle out detailed information about 26 different leaves, many that rarely make it into mainstream American kitchens. Including scientific names, appearance, flavor, and culinary and medicinal uses, this…

Italian Cooking in Paradise: A16 is A-1

As a cookbook junkie --- close to 200 of my 3500 cookbooks concern Italian cooking --- I drool when books like Nate Appleman's A16: Food + Wine show up. The cover alone is worth the $35.00 admission price, for the photo makes my soul cry out for the simplicity it represents. Not because anything's sad…

THE GOURMAND WORLD COOKBOOK AWARDS

In less than a month, some lucky cookbook authors will win the year's Gourmand World Cookbook Awards at the Frankfurt Book Fair, October 13-15, 2008. Edouard Cointreau founded the World Cookbook Awards in 1995, which were renamed Gourmand World Cookbook Awards in 2001. Mr. Cointreau's lineage is almost as illustrious as that of his liqueurs,…

It’s Superfruit! It’s an American Thang! It’s The Blueberry!

Call it what you may ---  whortleberry, bilberry, huckleberry, starberry, hurtleberry, buckleberry, or blaeberry. A card-carrying member of the Vaccinium family, with all its cousins. Whatever the Native Americans or the early American settlers called blueberries, today the health media calls them Superfruit. Full of vitamin C and vitamin K, scientists are just now confirming…