Cooking Equipment, Mostly Old, Beautiful, and Functional

Kitchen at Windsor Castle (1819 illustration)
Kitchen at Windsor Castle (1819 illustration)
Cooking equipment dates back to the first stick holding skewered meat over a hot fire after days of hunting. All of these photos show items that could be written about in tomes. But let’s settle for the old adage — “A picture is worth a thousand words” — and leave it at that for the moment.
Roman Frying Pan, 3rd Century A.D. (National Museum Wales)
Roman Frying Pan, 3rd Century A.D. (National Museum Wales)
Stoneware jar (Photo credit: Wendy Slatterly)
Stoneware jar (Photo credit: Wendy Slatterly)
Butter Keeper (Modern) (Photo credit: Francis Toms)
Butter Keeper (Modern) (Photo credit: Francis Toms)
Mortars and pestles, Italy (Photo credit: Mario Bernardini)
Mortars and pestles, Italy (Photo credit: Mario Bernardini)
Sieves (Photo credit: Wendy Slatterly)
Sieves (Photo credit: Wendy Slatterly)
Old Pots
Old Pots
Down in the Dairy (Photo credit: Wendy Slatterly)
Down in the Dairy (Photo credit: Wendy Slatterly)
Old Milk Bucket (U.S.) (Photo credit: Jim Frazier)
Old Milk Bucket (U.S.) (Photo credit: Jim Frazier)
Cooking equipment and hearth, Chateau de Chillon (Photo credit: Steven Wagner)
Cooking equipment and hearth, Chateau de Chillon (Photo credit: Steven Wagner)
Ice Tower (Photo credit: Wendy Slatterly)
Ice Tower (Photo credit: Wendy Slatterly)
Kitchen at Castle Beynac (Photo credit: Lawrence Rice)
Kitchen at Castle Beynac (Photo credit: Lawrence Rice)

And we’ll end with a bowl of bean soup, thank you very much:

Cooking equipment Tuscan white bean soup

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10 Comments Add yours

  1. Thanks for the tip, I’ll check it out.

    John.

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  2. Go to http://www.thevista.co.uk/index.php?page=wales_02-Penrhyn_Castle and there’s a short description of how ice was placed there for food storage. You might contact the castle (part of the national trust) itself if you have further questions.

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  3. A nice little post and easily digested. I like the old photos of castle kitchens but I was wondering… How does the Ice Tower work?

    Thanks for sharing!
    John.

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  4. cbertel says:

    No, not fava beans, but rather white beans. Fava beans would work, too, and that is what people ate prior to the Columbian Exchange, when the foodstuffs of the New World traveled across the Atlantic to the Old World and vice versa.

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  5. Marilyn says:

    Is the last foto fava bean soup?

    Marilyn

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  6. cbertel says:

    That’s really terrific — I have one dinner plate with a pheasant motif from my paternal grandmother. I wish I had more things, as she really enjoyed cooking.

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  7. cbertel says:

    Lila,

    The pictures in this case come from other people. I occasionally put my own up if they enhance the topic.

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  8. amy halpern says:

    I still have and use my grandmothers wood chopping bowl and hand chopper. It was her mother’s. Both the bowl and my great grandmother came from Russia. It’s easily over 100 yrs old. She used it mostly when she made chopped liver and I pull it out whenever i make it. It was made out of one piece of wood and its still beautiful. Oh the history it could tell were it able to talk.

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  9. lila says:

    Thank you for this great article. Your pics are so beautiful! Those sieves remind me of the ones my grand-mother used to use…

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  10. lovely images Cindy. As you say, each speaks a thousand words, at least (not that I dont like words, of course!)

    Like

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